Thursday, March 6, 2008

they're wrong


Just a short note to say that they are wrong, what they say about San Francisco.
They say it is changed, lost, gone, straight, rich, impossible to live there. It may be more expensive, but I think it is still possible. Just depends how much you want it, how much you are willing to work for it.

People often come to Portland because it is easy. They can be a barista and have a band at night. And as much as hipsters of all ages say they want "diversity," if it really was the priority, they would not be there.
I am not saying that ease is wrong! But I am not wild about hearing the City wrote off like that.
"Impossible." Bullshit. The beauty here sears my eyeballs.
The old buildings are still here. The sleaze in the tenderloin is still here - almost heartening to see it. The racket outside. The weirdoes are still here. They didn't whitewash it all away. And nothing, nothing can erase the light unique to this town, which feels right now like a balm.

I had a great time in Ashland, hanging with the town's two greatest artists. The elections results seeped in as we drank at Martino's, with someone venturing to say that: "I think Hillary just might get the nomination" - and not like she was something to be burned at the stake. Maybe I can do a studio visit with Matthew Picton on the way back.

9 comments:

Anna L. Conti said...

I don't know who "they" are, but of course they're wrong. San Francisco is full of artists and other folks living below the poverty line and loving the light, the weather, the views, the book stores, the food, the neighborhoods, the diversity . . .

Steven LaRose said...

Maaan, is Portland THAT bad? (tee hee)

I hope you do catch Matthew on the way back up, if anything, I've got a folder of photo-montage fodder that I forgot to give you.

Did I hear the bartender right when he said that for him, it was a win, win, win election? He was willing to roll with either party at this point.

Anonymous said...

Well, I agree with the bartender in as much as all of the possibilities right now are a light at the end of an 8 year long horrendous tunnel.
E

harold hollingsworth said...

wish I could have been at the bar with you all, better than here in my studio with the TV in the background, and Wolf Blitzer audio rolling...

Anonymous said...

Harold, it would have been great to have you there. Ever since I've been on the road, doing nothing but visiting artists very night, I've been thinking WHY can't my life be like this more often? But at home we have our patterns and I suppose I wouldn't get much work done if it was....

E

Anonymous said...

Portland easy? Maybe if you're single and renting. I'm working two jobs (60 hours) just so my family can scrape by in this town.

The PDX job market is thin, and employers pay less. In SF, you can find more jobs with better pay, but you'll be giving most of your paycheck to the landlord...the possibility of home ownership is slim, but purchasing a home in PDX may be out of reach for most artists now. More collectors in SF, but maybe LA is the best bang for the buck?

Anonymous said...

Well, Anonymous, I certainly agree with you on some fronts about the cost of living in PDX, so let me retract and retrench a bit.

When I came back here 11 years ago, I got a job in which people said I had negoiated a good wage. I laughed - there was no "negotiating" to me - the last time I had made that money was in the 80s in SF!

And it all went downhill from there! Meanwhile, it's not like I was paying 80s rent.

There's a PDX host from SF who has parties filled with people from SF or points beyond... not youngsters either. Anyway, the talk is always the same at the parties: they can't find a decent job, sometimes ANY job, except ones that literally pay 8 bucks an hour.

Which is OK for baristas and poets who are young and don't need health insurance yet. That's what I mean by easy. If you're young, I think it's very possible here. But after about 30 or so, you don't really have alot of options....

E

Pretty Lady said...

Vesuvio's! Oh, I miss SF.

I was there before, during and after the tech boom; during the days when every car on the freeway was a brand new Beamer, I did feel like my city had been taken away from me. But when the bubble burst, all the old seedy splendor seemed to return, or at least spring back into balance.

Anonymous said...

Vesuvio's might be one of the most magical bars in this country - not just in SF. Every night I've been here, something strange and memorable has happened. Eva